ALEXANDER DOLGUN PDF

Dolgun, an American who was snatched from the streets of Moscow in and spent eight years in Soviet prisons, is dead of kidney failure at age Dolgun died Tuesday at a hospital in nearby Gaithersburg, Md. Dolgun was 8 when his father, an automotive mechanic, moved the family from New York to Russia. Embassy in Moscow, later becoming head of the files section of the consular section.

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After a year in Moscow, Michael consented to another one-year tour on the condition that the Soviet Union pay for his family to come over. He was interned in the infamous Lubyanka and Lefortovo prisons in Moscow. He was falsely accused of espionage against the Soviet Union and endured a year of sleep and food deprivation, as well as brutal psychological and physical torture designed to prod him into "confessing" to his interrogator, Colonel Sidorov.

After successfully enduring this trial, Dolgun was transferred to Sukhanovka , a former monastery converted into a prison.

He survived several months of intense torture and was one of a very few who survived the prison with their sanity intact, using tactics such as measuring various distances in his cell as well as distances he covered walking; he estimated that in his time there, the distance he covered walking was enough to take him from Moscow across Europe and halfway across the Atlantic Ocean.

His time in Sukhanovka brought him to the brink of death, and he was transferred to the hospital at Butyrki prison to recuperate. His whereabouts were known by Truman, Eisenhower and the US government, but they did nothing for fear of Soviet authorities further harming Dolgun due to fragile US-Soviet relations.

Dolgun was finally given a twenty-five year sentence in the Gulag, the network of prisoner work camps scattered throughout the Soviet Union. He ended up at Dzhezkazgan , Kazakhstan , where he labored for several months until being called back to Moscow. His recall was initiated by the infamous Colonel Mikhail Ryumin , No. Ryumin intended to use Dolgun as a puppet in a show trial. Dolgun was once again sent to Sukhanovka, where Ryumin personally tortured and beat him in an effort to get him to confess to a number of plots and conspiracies against the Soviet Union.

Dolgun did not serve at Kengir , but at a camp nearby. He did, however, write about the Kengir Uprising in his autobiography. After prison After his release from prison in , Dolgun returned to Moscow. Under his release conditions he was not allowed to contact American authorities.

Dolgun discovered that both his mother and father had been tortured in an effort to pressure them to implicate him, driving his mother to insanity. He took a job translating medical journals into English for the Soviet Health Bureau and befriended several notable Gulag survivors, including Georg Tenno and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

Dolgun married his wife, Irene, in and they had a son Andrew in His mother died in , and his father in Humes, Dolgun managed to get an exit visa and relocated to Rockville , Maryland. Embassy for the period of service from to and complained that he was paid "peanuts" for his time and should have, at the least, received interest on his salary.

Dolgun died on August 28, , at the age of 59 in Potomac, Maryland of kidney failure. He was survived by his wife and son. See also.

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Alexander Dolgun's Story: An American in the Gulag

To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions. Alexander M. Dolgun, an American who spent eight years in Soviet labor camps, has died of kidney failure. He was 59 years old. Dolgun, who was born in New York, went to the Soviet Union with his parents and sister when his father took a job as an auto mechanic in Dolgun worked as a file clerk at the United States Embassy in Moscow.

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Alexander Dolgun

After a year in Moscow, Michael consented to another one-year tour on the condition that the Soviet Union pay for his family to come over. He was interned in the infamous Lubyanka and Lefortovo prisons in Moscow. He was falsely accused of espionage against the Soviet Union and endured a year of sleep and food deprivation, as well as brutal psychological and physical torture designed to prod him into "confessing" to his interrogator, Colonel Sidorov. After successfully enduring this trial, Dolgun was transferred to Sukhanovka , a former monastery converted into a prison. He survived several months of intense torture and was one of a very few who survived the prison with their sanity intact, using tactics such as measuring various distances in his cell as well as distances he covered walking; he estimated that in his time there, the distance he covered walking was enough to take him from Moscow across Europe and halfway across the Atlantic Ocean. His time in Sukhanovka brought him to the brink of death, and he was transferred to the hospital at Butyrki prison to recuperate.

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