EUPHORBIA CYATHOPHORA PDF

Euphorbia heterophylla L. Family Euphorbiaceae Common Names catalina, dwarf poinsettia, fire on the mountain, fire-on-the-mountain, Mexican fire plant, painted leaf, painted poinsettia, painted spurge, painted-leaf, painted-leaf spurge, poinsettia, summer poinsettia, wild poinsettia Origin Native to tropical North America i. Cultivation Painted spurge Euphorbia cyathophora is widely cultivated, particularly in the warmer parts of Australia, for its attractive reddish-coloured floral leaves. Naturalised Distribution This species has a widespread, but scattered, distribution throughout much of Australia. It is most common in the coastal districts of Queensland and northern New South Wales, scattered in the Northern Territory and in the northern and western parts of Western Australia, and present in the coastal districts of central New South Wales.

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Euphorbia heterophylla L. Family Euphorbiaceae Common Names catalina, dwarf poinsettia, fire on the mountain, fire-on-the-mountain, Mexican fire plant, painted leaf, painted poinsettia, painted spurge, painted-leaf, painted-leaf spurge, poinsettia, summer poinsettia, wild poinsettia Origin Native to tropical North America i.

Cultivation Painted spurge Euphorbia cyathophora is widely cultivated, particularly in the warmer parts of Australia, for its attractive reddish-coloured floral leaves. Naturalised Distribution This species has a widespread, but scattered, distribution throughout much of Australia. It is most common in the coastal districts of Queensland and northern New South Wales, scattered in the Northern Territory and in the northern and western parts of Western Australia, and present in the coastal districts of central New South Wales.

Also naturalised on several offshore islands i. Naturalised in many other parts of the world, including on numerous Pacific islands e. Habitat This species is a weed of disturbed sites, waste areas, roadsides, creek banks i. However, it is most abundant as a weed of coastal environs and offshore islands. Habit A short-lived i. Stems and Leaves The upright i. Stems and branches are green in colour and mostly hairless i. The stems and leaves also exude a caustic milky sap i.

The upper surface of these leaves is hairless i. The leaves at the tips of the branches i. Seeds are egg-shaped i. It is ranked among the top environmental weeds in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales, and appears on numerous local environmental weed lists in these regions. This species prefers sandy soils, particularly in disturbed sites. In Queensland painted spurge Euphorbia cyathophora is most prevalent in the south-eastern parts of the state, but is also a weed of beaches and offshore islands in the north e.

In New South Wales painted spurge Euphorbia cyathophora is mainly a problem in coastal sandy sites north of Coffs Harbour on the mid north coast. Other Impacts This species is poisonous to humans.

Legislation Not declared or considered noxious by any state government authorities. Check our website at www. The control methods referred to in this fact sheet should be used in accordance with the restrictions federal and state legislation, and local government laws directly or indirectly related to each control method. These restrictions may prevent the use of one or more of the methods referred to, depending on individual circumstances.

While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of this information, DEEDI does not invite reliance upon it, nor accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused by actions based on it. All rights reserved. Identic Pty Ltd.

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Plant Database

It is more branched and wider above than below; the lower stem is usually unbranched. The stems are light green to medium green, more or less terete, and glabrous or nearly so. The lower to middle leaves are either alternate or opposite, while the upper leaves near the inflorescences are opposite. The lower leaves are often early-deciduous. The leaves of this plant are obovate, oblanceolate, elliptic, or linear-oblong in shape; sometimes these variations in shape can occur even on the same plant. When lateral lobes occur, they are few in number with pointed tips and concave sinuses; they are often irregular in size, shape, and position. The upper leaf surface is medium green and glabrous, while the lower leaf surface is light green and glabrous to mostly glabrous; sometimes there are a few hairs along the undersides of major veins.

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Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet

Similar to that plant, Fire-on-the-Mountain typically produces red to orange-red tipped leaves adjacent to its green flowers. This annual is found on dry, open sites near the northern limit of its range, where it often grows less than two feet tall. Further to the south, moister, shadier habitat is more typical, where it can grow up to three feet tall and can be a weed. The species is most common in the tropics, its range extending well into South America, and has been introduced in parts of Asia and Australia as a cultivated ornamental, where has become invasive. Most members of the Euphorbia Spurge family have a milky sap in the stem that will irritate eyes and mouth if it comes in contact.

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