EVENT METAPHOR MEMORY SHAHID AMIN PDF

In the event good historical sense prevailed, and the Bare Lat saheb agreed to these being locked up in the Agra fort. The certitude of memory had been stopped short of crowning a historic triumph. The raid on Somnath by Mahmud is a historical fact, but of greater interest for a historian of multiple representations that adhere or bounce over the past is what is made of this event. Hers is an attempt to demonstrate soberly and analytically how "the event is enveloped in a variety of tellings, linked to the histories of communities and their identities". Instead, a bilingual Sanskrit-Arabic sale deed of refers to an amicable agreement between an Arab shipowner and aldermen of the temple town, witnessed to by the local brihat purusha, laying aside land and resources for the construction of a mijigiti masjid for the locally resident Muslims.

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Content[ edit ] Amin explores the events leading up to, during, and immediately after the burning of the Chauri Chaura thana in and murder of 22 police officers to see if the Indian popular memory of the event is accurate. The Indian popular memory is that the perpetrators were not nationalists, but criminals with no relationship to the Non-Cooperation Movement and later Nationalist Movement s that Gandhi led and eventually forced the British to leave the country Amin shows how Gandhi and even British justice forged this non-political identity onto the nationalists around Chauri Chaura.

Amin aims to dissect the events around Chauri Chaura, and then analyze how the event was remembered and used as a metaphor of what not to do by the Nationalist Movement and later history.

Along with this, Amin asks if there is any other evidence contained deeper in the story that can show the nationalist leanings of the peasantry meaning dress codes, foods, and language, for example. Amin asks if the later retaliation of the police after the burning of the thana or the trials show anything about the nationalist character of the peasantry. Also, Amin seeks to understand how the memory and metaphor of Chauri Chaura was constructed and reinforced so much so that in the latter half of the twentieth century, it was identified as an event firmly placed outside the boundaries of the nationalist movement.

Another subtle question is whether the unintended consequences of the Non-Cooperation Movement can really be shed from the shoulders of Gandhi and said movement. Finally, the question of memory itself is explored, and whether any exploration of such a specific event 70 years after the fact can attain a degree of historical accuracy that allows convincing conclusions, beyond the more vague, to be made.

Amin shows the nationalist movement to have deeply penetrated the area around the Chauri Chaura station, both with local organizing committees and propaganda, avoidance of foreign foods and clothing, but more visibly, the presence of many otiyars volunteers, or nationalist members trained to oppose instability and mob rule in the countryside begging for grain.

Otiyars who had been nationalists the day before the riot now became misguided anti-nationalists. From then on, the trials would define the act as criminal, and the main approver Sikhari would relate his recognition of the event primarily in non-political terms. The judges, while recognizing the political nature of the event, pursued it on criminal ground in order to avoid any attempt at justification by the defense and the public at large.

The police quickly became victims, and eventually a tragic casualty of the nationalist movement in popular opinion, even though they provoked the riot by their abusive behavior of local leaders.

Contemporary Sociology.

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Event, Metaphor, Memory: Chauri Chaura, 1922-1992

Content[ edit ] Amin explores the events leading up to, during, and immediately after the burning of the Chauri Chaura thana in and murder of 22 police officers to see if the Indian popular memory of the event is accurate. The Indian popular memory is that the perpetrators were not nationalists, but criminals with no relationship to the Non-Cooperation Movement and later Nationalist Movement s that Gandhi led and eventually forced the British to leave the country Amin shows how Gandhi and even British justice forged this non-political identity onto the nationalists around Chauri Chaura. Amin aims to dissect the events around Chauri Chaura, and then analyze how the event was remembered and used as a metaphor of what not to do by the Nationalist Movement and later history. Along with this, Amin asks if there is any other evidence contained deeper in the story that can show the nationalist leanings of the peasantry meaning dress codes, foods, and language, for example. Amin asks if the later retaliation of the police after the burning of the thana or the trials show anything about the nationalist character of the peasantry. Also, Amin seeks to understand how the memory and metaphor of Chauri Chaura was constructed and reinforced so much so that in the latter half of the twentieth century, it was identified as an event firmly placed outside the boundaries of the nationalist movement.

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Event, Metaphor, Memory

Appalled that his teachings were turned to violent ends, Gandhi called off his Noncooperation Movement and fasted to bring the people back to nonviolence. In the meantime, the British government denied that the riot reflected Indian resistance to its rule and tried the rioters as common criminals. These events have taken on great symbolic importance among Indians, both in the immediate region and nationally. Amin examines the event itself, but also, more significantly, he explores the ways it has been remembered, interpreted, and used as a metaphor for the Indian struggle for independence. The author, who was born fifteen miles from Chauri Chaura, brings to his study an empathetic knowledge of the region and a keen ear for the nuances of the culture and language of its people. In an ingenious negotiation between written and oral evidence, he combines brilliant archival work in the judicial records of the period with field interviews with local informants.

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