FRIEDRICH SCHLEGEL LUCINDE AND THE FRAGMENTS PDF

Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Introduction Lucinde is an unusualbook written at a time of unusual books and unusual events. In , the year of its publication, the French Revolution was taking its first militant steps into Empire, and a new literary and philosophicalmovement,asyet unnamed,was also preparing to march against the old establishment. For Napoleon, it was supposedlya struggle of the liberal French armies against the restrictive forces of the conservative world; for the Romantics, as they came later to be called, it was a war against the rational, neoclassic conception of art and life, symbolizedby the French authors and philosophers of the seventeenthcentury. When Lucinde was first published, most of its public realized that it was an unusual novel, but only in the sense that it was unusually bad. Still, the book wasnot wholly without enthusiastic admirers , even quite eminent ones.

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Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Introduction Lucinde is an unusualbook written at a time of unusual books and unusual events. In , the year of its publication, the French Revolution was taking its first militant steps into Empire, and a new literary and philosophicalmovement,asyet unnamed,was also preparing to march against the old establishment. For Napoleon, it was supposedlya struggle of the liberal French armies against the restrictive forces of the conservative world; for the Romantics, as they came later to be called, it was a war against the rational, neoclassic conception of art and life, symbolizedby the French authors and philosophers of the seventeenthcentury.

When Lucinde was first published, most of its public realized that it was an unusual novel, but only in the sense that it was unusually bad. Still, the book wasnot wholly without enthusiastic admirers , even quite eminent ones. And another friend, the philosopher Fichte,2 declared in September that Lucinde was one of the greatest productions of genius he knew, and that he was about to embark on his third reading of it.

But these and some few other favorable reactions were not enough to stem the tidal wave of hostile criticism that threatened to inundate the book completely. Friends and philosophers might console Schlegel, but they could not rescue hisbook from generalcondemnation.

The hostile contemporary reception of a literary work of merit is, of course, no unusual occurrence; on the contrary, it is one of the clichesof literary history. What one generationrejects, the next accepts; what one generationthrows into the garbage pail, the next places on the dining-room table. The cliche, however, has not held completely true in this particular instance.

Although, in Germany at any rate, the public in the twentieth century hasat last given wide acceptance to Lucinde, the critics have been more slow and grudging in their approval. The reasons for this critical hesitancy are complex, but the very fact of the hesitancy probably indicates how much ahead of its timeLucinde actuallywas.

At the very beginning it appeared almost as if Lucinde was 1. His best known works are Bestimrmmg des Gelehrten Vocation of the Scholar , and Uber den Begriff der Wissenschaftslehre On the Notion of the Theory of Knowledge , dating from the same year, but expanded in subsequent years. A word about the footnotes: No strict rule of annotation has been followed , but in general those names which might seem unfamiliar to the English -speaking reader have been briefly identified.

Friedrich Schlegel himself may havebeen partly responsible for this temporary oblivion. When in he came to edit and publish his complete works, he omitted Lucinde altogether.

By that time Schlegel, grown old, Catholic, and conservative , no longer approved of his period of youthfulradicalism and exuberance. But what the aging Schlegel perhaps wished to eradicate from the memory of mankind was resurrected six years after his death by an artist and critic who was still young, exuberant , and radical. In , Karl Gutzkow3 issued the second edition of Lucinde, and it soon became one of the basic texts of the Young Germany movement of which he was aleader.

The second edition of Lucinde forced a smaller re-enactment of the original battle of Ironically, the most notable hostile critical reaction came from Heinrich Heine, himself a quasimember of the Young Germany movement, as well If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution or have your own login and password to Project MUSE.

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Friedrich Schlegel's Lucinde and the Fragments

Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. For the last century and a half, Friedrich Schlegel — has enjoyed a reputation for being the critical grey eminence behind the coming to power of the Romantic Movement. It was Schlegel, in his three series of aphoristic fragments Lyceum, Athenaeum, and Ideas , who actually first defined and employed the word "romantic" in the present sense; and it was he who in a chaotic, fragmentary, and often mysterious but forceful manner first proclaimed the doctrine that was to usher in the modern age in literature. He too was among the first to put his new program into practice in the shape of his unfinished Lucinde,a work variously denounced as pornography and heralded as a forerunner of modern novelistic experimentation, and probably the most famous novel to come out of German Romanticism. Both the Fragments and Lucinde,along with a brilliant tour de force, the "Essay on Incomprehensibility," are available now for the first time in a complete English translation in this volume, together with a brief scholarly introduction. This translation will enable non-German readers to examine at first hand the work of a man whom Rene Wellck has called "one of the greatest critics of history. The book will be of particular interest to theorists of literature and fiction, comparative literature scholars, and historians of the intellectual history of Germany, and it is appropriate for course use in German and comparative literature classes.

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Friedrich Schlegel

Life and Works The youngest of five sons, Schlegel was born in Hanover into a distinguished and culturally prominent literary family. His father, Johann Adolf Schlegel, was both a clergyman and literary figure; his uncle, Johann Elias, was a dramatist and aesthetic theorist; and his elder brother by five years, August Wilhelm, was to become the great German translator of Shakespeare and one of the most prominent literary critics of the time. In the succeeding couple of years, he wrote several early essays on Greek literature amid plans for a history of classical poetry. Schlegel remained in Jena for almost a year, but then moved to Berlin, where he became a regular visitor to the salons of Henriette Herz and Rahel Levin and established contact with several important figures of the Romantic movement. During his time in Berlin, Schlegel also began a relationship with Dorothea Veit, daughter of Moses Mendelssohn, who had left her banker husband Simon Veit in

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Lucinde and the Fragments

In he devoted himself entirely to literary work. Novalis and Schlegel had a famous conversation about German idealism. In he quarreled with Schiller, who did not like his polemic work. Then he turned to Dante, Goethe, and Shakespeare. In Jena he and his brother founded the journal Athenaeum , contributing fragments, aphorisms, and essays in which the principles of the Romantic school are most definitely stated.

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