GONCHAROV OBLOMOV PDF

Nov 19, knig rated it it was amazing Recommended to knig by: howl of minerva Shelves: classics , favourites , I know Im not going to do Oblomov justice: this is what happens when Im in awe. Im much better really at slagging books off. Masterpieces leave me Im not worthy tongue-tied. Oblomov is so big hes become a word in Russian: oblomovschina.

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Although Goncharov was not working on Oblomov during his long journey it appears he was thinking about the book, as Oblomov shows up in many of his letters home. When he tried to begin writing again in February , he blamed his delays and inability to write on exhaustion, loss of momentum, and a new and more demanding job as a censor. By the end of August the novel was complete. He spent the following year revising and rewriting the novel until finally on January 14, , Oblomov was published in Otechestvennye zapiski.

Oblomov raises this trait to an art form, conducting his little daily business from his bed. The first part of the book finds Oblomov in bed one morning. He receives a letter from the manager of his country estate, Oblomovka, explaining that the financial situation is deteriorating and that he must visit to make some major decisions. But Oblomov can barely leave his bedroom, much less journey a thousand miles into the country.

He is never required to work or perform household duties, and his parents constantly pull him from school for vacations and trips or for trivial reasons. In contrast, his friend Andrey Stoltz, born to a German father and a Russian mother, is raised in a strict, disciplined environment, and he is dedicated and hard-working. Stoltz visits at the end of Part 1, finally rousing Oblomov from sleep.

As the story develops, Stoltz introduces Oblomov to a young woman, Olga, and the two fall in love. However, his apathy and fear of moving forward are too great, and she calls off their engagement when it is clear that he will keep delaying their wedding and avoiding putting his affairs in order. The last time, Oblomov ends up living in penury because Taranteyev and Ivan Matveyevich are blackmailing him out of all of his income from the country estate, which lasts for over a year before Stoltz discovers the situation and reports Ivan Matveyevich to his supervisor.

Meanwhile, Olga leaves Russia and visits Paris, where she bumps into Stoltz on the street. The two strike up a romance and end up marrying. However, not even Oblomov could go through life without at least one moment of self-possession and purpose. Sometime before his death he is visited by Stoltz, who had promised to his wife a last attempt at bringing Oblomov back to the world. During this visit Stoltz discovers that Oblomov has married his widowed landlady, Agafia Pshenitsina, and had a child - named Andrey, after Stoltz.

Stoltz realizes that he can no longer hope to reform Oblomov, and leaves. Oblomov spends the rest of his life in a second Oblomovka, continuing to be taken care of by Agafia Pshenitsina as he used to be taken care of as a child. She can prepare the food he likes, meal, and makes sure that Oblomov does not have a single worrisome thought.

By then Oblomov had already accepted his fate, and during the conversation he mentions "Oblomovitis" as the real cause of his demise. Oblomov dies in his sleep, finally fulfilling his wish to sleep forever. Stoltz adopts his son upon his death. Characters[ edit ] Ilya Ilyich Oblomov is the eponymous character of the novel. Raised to never worry about his education or the running of his inherited estate, Oblomov spends the novel attempting to recreate his childhood idyll.

By the beginning of the story, his inactivity and fear of responsibility have led to the disrepair of his estate and personal affairs. Only Stoltz can get him out of bed, but cannot convince Oblomov to revisit his estate.

Olga eventually breaks off the engagement when she realizes that Oblomov is unable to change his ways. His efforts center mainly around getting Oblomov to regain control of his estate.

She and Oblomov fall in love, and her efforts seem to be successful for a time, as Oblomov reads more novels and attends more social events. Olga then travels to Paris with her aunt, where she runs into Stoltz.

The two fall in love and marry, moving to the Crimea. He constantly tries to get Oblomov to get his life in order by reminding him about the dues of his estate. He is an ineffective servant but extremely devoted to his master, and he holds the Oblomov family in high esteem. At the end of the story, it is revealed to Stoltz that Oblomov and Agafia are married with a son. Taranteyev and Ivan end up blackmailing Oblomov out of all of his income from the country estate. This stunt lasts for over a year before Stoltz discovers the situation and reports Ivan Matveyevich and Taranteyev to his supervisor.

Narrator[ edit ] The narrator of Oblomov appears as a rather traditional third person narrator. In the beginning of the novel he is largely invisible and lets the characters do the talking. The narrator seems to be someone who may wish he knew the answers but is honest enough to admit that he does not.

Goncharov is eager by the end of the novel to make a distinction between himself and the narrator by making the narrator an invented character. However, Goncharov chooses to reveal the identity of the narrator only when the revelation would not affect our reading of the novel.

Characterizations and Depictions[ edit ] Goncharov used a lot of dialogue within his works. Therefore, the characters in Oblomov reveal themselves primarily through their own speech, with very limited comments by the author. Petersburg, government work, and marriage. Petersburg during their university years. Goncharov himself lost his father at the age of seven, and worked in St.

Petersburg as a translator after graduating from Moscow State University. Aduev, the protagonist of A Common Story, also isolates himself from reality and prefers to live within his imagination much like Oblomov does.

Such is the pattern according to which life weaves itself this seamless length of identical fabric to be snipped gently only at the grave itself. Adulthood[ edit ] Adulthood constantly discourages Oblomov, whose main desire is to retreat into the safety of his childhood sense of time.

Even his desire to return to Oblomovka cannot be realized, as the estate has fallen into disarray and has now become a responsibility instead of a safe haven. His main foray into adulthood comes about through Olga, who attempts to motivate him to take on responsibilities out of love for her.

Particularly for Oblomov, adulthood means changing his cyclical sense of time to continually look forward instead of back. Stoltz, unlike Oblomov, sees his life as a straight line and is therefore driven by the desire to continually move forward. Nikolai Dobrolyubov , in his article "What is Oblomovism? Goncharov himself thought of Oblomov more as a treatise on human nature than as commentary on Russian society, [2] but Dobrolyubov focused heavily on Oblomov and Stoltz as social and ethical antitheses; Oblomov became an allegory for superfluity of Russian aristocracy in a time when serfdom was soon to be abolished.

Stoltz introduces new infrastructure and education for the peasants at Oblomovka, and revitalizes its profits. Yet just as Russia no longer has a place for Oblomov, Russia similarly does not yet have a place for Stoltz as a leader of social change, and Stoltz continuously travels to different countries instead of staying in Russia for business. Olga, therefore, becomes the link between past and future Russia, in her love for Oblomov and her marriage to Stoltz.

Today it is still seen as a classic of 19th century Russian literature, and a quintessential Russian novel. Rather than interpreting characters as either warnings or ideals of society, Druzhinin praised the portrayal of Stoltz and Olga as psychological and artistic foils to Oblomov.

Druzhinin believed that Oblomov, not oblomovism, was the focus of the novel; characters and readers alike loved Oblomov, making him deserving of recognition as a unique character within Russian literary canon.

It starred Spike Milligan , who used less and less of the original script until eventually the entire piece was improvised farce; also in the cast were Joan Greenwood , Bill Owen , and Valentine Dyall.

National Board of Review. In BBC Radio 4 made a two-part English language dramatisation, heralding the lead character as a tragic-comic hero for a couch potato generation. In an adaptation was produced for the English service of the Russian national broadcaster, the Voice of Russia.

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Ivan Goncharov

Although Goncharov was not working on Oblomov during his long journey it appears he was thinking about the book, as Oblomov shows up in many of his letters home. When he tried to begin writing again in February , he blamed his delays and inability to write on exhaustion, loss of momentum, and a new and more demanding job as a censor. By the end of August the novel was complete. He spent the following year revising and rewriting the novel until finally on January 14, , Oblomov was published in Otechestvennye zapiski.

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Early life[ edit ] Ivan Goncharov was born in Simbirsk now Ulyanovsk. His father Alexander Ivanovich Goncharov was a wealthy grain merchant and a state official who served several terms as mayor of Simbirsk. He was educated first by his mother, Avdotya Matveevna, and then his godfather Nikolay Nikolayevich Tregubov, a nobleman and a former Russian Navy officer. Fyodor S. There he spent eight unhappy years, detesting the low quality of education and the severe discipline, taking solace in self-education. One episode proved to be especially memorable: when his then idol Alexander Pushkin arrived as a guest lecturer to have a public debate with professor Mikhail T.

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